World cup winners list

October 10, 2008
1966 England England England 4-2 Germany
1970 Mexico Brazil Brazil 4-1 Italy
1974 Germany Germany Germany 2-1 Holland
1978 Argentina Argentina Argentina 3-1 Holland
1982 Spain Italy Italy 3-1 Germany
1986 Mexico Argentina Argentina 3-2 Germany
1990 Italy Germany Germany 1-0 Argentina
1994 US Brazil Brazil 3-2 Italy
1998 France France France 3-0 Brazil
2002 Japan / S. Korea Brazil Brazil 2-0 Germany
2006 Germany Italy Italy 1-1 (5-3) France
2010 South Africa    

WOORLD CUP LOGOS FROM 1966 TO 2010

September 27, 2008

WORLD CUP 1966_England

WORLD CUP 1970_Mexico

WORLD CUP 1974_West Germany

WORLD CUP 1978_Argentina

WORLD CUP 1982_Spain

WORLD CUP 1986_Mexico

WORLD CUP 1990_Italy

WORLD CUP 1994_USA

WORLD CUP 1998_France

WORLD CUP 2002_JAPAN South Korea

WORLD CUP 2006_Germany

WORLD CUP LOGO 2010

September 27, 2008

World Cup Logo 2010

Images of each events (Rules)

September 22, 2008

Frere Kick

Penalty kIcK

Throw in

Goal Cick

Corner Kick

Off side

A player is in an offside position if:

  • he is nearer to his opponents’ goal line than both the ball and the second last opponent

Football Rules

September 19, 2008

Free Kick

Free-kicks shall be classified under two headings. Direct (from which a goal can be scored direct against the offending side) and Indirect (from which a goal cannot be scored unless the ball has been played or touched by a player other than the kicker before passing through the goal).

When a player is taking a direct or an indirect free kick inside his own penalty area, all the opposing players are at least 10 yards from the ball and remain outside the penalty area until the ball has been kicked out of the area. The ball will be in play immediately it has traveled the distance of its own circumference and is beyond the penalty area. The goal keeper will not receive the ball into his hands, in order that he may thereafter kick it into play. If the ball is not kicked direct into play, beyond the penalty area, the kick is retaken.

When a player is taking a direct or an indirect free kick outside his own penalty area, all of the opposing players are at least 10 yards from the ball, until it is in play, unless they are standing on their own goal line between the goal post. The ball will be in play when it has traveled the distance of its own circumference.

If a player of the opposing side encroaches into the penalty area or within 10 yards of the ball before a free kick is taken, the referee may delay the taking of the kick, until the law is complied with.

The ball must be stationary when a free kick is taken and the kicker will not play the ball a second time until it has been touched or played by another player.

Notwithstanding any other reference in these laws to the point from which a free kick is to be taken.

Any free kick awarded to the defending team, within its own goal area may be taken from any point within that half of the goal area in which the free kick has been awarded.

Any indirect free kick awarded to the attacking team within its opponents goal area was taken from that part of the goal area line which runs parallel to the goal line, at the point nearest to where the offence was committed.

Penalty Kick

A penalty kick is taken from the penalty mark and when it is being taken, all players with the exception of the player taking the kick, properly identified, and the opposing goal keeper, is within the field of play but outside the penalty area, and at least 10 yards from the penalty mark. The opposing goal keeper must stand (without moving his feet) on his own goal line, between the goal posts, until the ball is kicked. The player taking the kick must kick the ball forward. He will not play the ball a second time until it has been toughed or played by another player. A goal may be scored directly from a penalty kick. When a penalty kick is being taken during the normal course of play or when time has been extended to half time or full time to allow a penalty kick to be taken or retaken, a goal will not be nullifies if, before passing between the posts and under the cross bar, the ball touches either or both of the goal posts or the cross bar or the goal keeper or any combinations of these agencies, providing that no other infringement has occurred.

Throw in

When the whole of the ball passes over a touch line, either on the ground or in the air, it is thrown in from the point where it crossed the line, in any direction, by a player of the team opposite to that of the player who last touched it. The thrower at the moment of delivering the ball must face the field of play and part of each foot shall be either on the touchline or on the ground outside the touch line. The thrower uses both hands and deliver the ball from behind and over his head. The ball is in play immediately, it enters the field of play, but the thrower will not  play the ball again until it has been touched or played by another player. A goal will not be scored direct from a throw in.

Goal Kick

When the ball passes over the goal line, excluding that portion between the goal posts, either in the air or on the ground, having last been played by one of the attacking team, it is kicked direct into play beyond the penalty area from a point within that half of the goal area nearest to where it crossed the line, by a player of the defending team. A goal keeper will not receive the ball into his hands from a goal kick in order that he may thereafter kick it into play. If the ball is not kicked beyond the penalty area i.e. direct into play, the kick is retaken. The kicker will not play the ball a second time until it has touched or been played by another player. A goal is not scored direct from such a kick. Players of the team opposing that of the player taking the goal kick remains outside the penalty area until the ball has been kicked out of the penalty area.

Corner Kick

When the whole of the ball passes over the goal line, excluding that portion between the goal posts, either in the air or on the ground, having last been played by one of the defending team, a member of the attacking team shall take a corner kick, i.e. the ball is placed within the quarter circle at the nearest corner flag post, which must not be moved and it must be kicked from that position. A goal may be scored direct from such a kick. Players of the team opposing that of the player taking the corner kick will not approach within 10 yards of the ball until it is in play nor  the kicker play the ball a second time until it has been touched or played by another player

Off Side

A player is in an off side position if he is nearer to his opponents goal line than the ball, unless there are at least two of his opponents nearer their own goal line than he is. A player is only declared off side and penalized for being in an off side position.

If a player is declared off side, the referee awards an indirect free kick, which is taken by a player of the opposing team from the place where the infringement occurred

Origin of Football

September 18, 2008

Football has a long history and many sources of influences. The first such reference goes all the way back to the 2nd century BC, in China during the Han Dynasty. A Chinese military manual refers to tsu chu, which was kicking a leather ball through a hole in some silk cloth that was hung between two poles standing about 30 feet tall. This form of sport was not really a game but simply done for the entertainment of the emperor.

Greeks and Romans played many games involving kicking balls with the feet, and there are many documents referencing ancient and traditional games played with some form of ball, from all over the world. These ancient forms of football were played between villages or towns that were neighbors with masses of people not counted out or limited in any way. Often, these led to bloody battles that were considered fun sport, yet injured many.

The first real reference to football, however, was recorded in 1409, when King Henry IV of England wanted to ban it. King James I of Scotland also wanted to ban “fute-ball” in 1424. There are records of some form of football in Ireland all the way back to 1527, when the Statute of Galway made football and archery legal but not “hokie” or several other sports. In the same century, the period between Epiphany and Lent was celebrated in Florence with a game known as “kickball in costume”, where aristocrats dressed up in fine silk and play a very violent sport resembling football.

Throughout history, there have been attempts to ban the game, as it evolved and occasionally was violent to the point of being fatal. Between the 14th and 17th century, in England alone, more than 30 royal and local laws attempted to end the sport. Edward III of England, in 1349, hated the practice, stating that it detracted from the popularity of archery, which was useful in war. This was particularly important to him, as many had been lost in the Black Death recently, and he felt the country needed as many archers as possible.

As a modern American game, the rules have changed considerably, though still an extremely physical game requiring harsh contact between players. However, the fact that the sport still exists at all is proof of its appeal to the masses and its durability under scrutiny.

What is FootBall?

September 17, 2008

Football:

https://worldcupfootball2010.wordpress.com/what-is-football/

Click the above link and Know more about football